Kington, William Miles


He was the son of Lieutenant-Colonel William Miles Napier Kington (formerly of 4th Hussars), of Wroxall, Somerset and Sophia Kington, nee Baker. He came to Winchester from Messrs. Blackburn and Freeman’s school but in 1890 he was compelled to leave on account of ill-health.

After a few years at Glenalmond he passed into Sandhurst, being gazetted the following year to the Royal Welch Fusiliers. He served with much distinction in the South African War and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith. He received the D.S.O. in 1902 and being four times mentioned in Despatches. In 1902, he undertook temporary service with the Constabulary and later served as Adjutant to Volunteer and Territorial battalions.

In August 1914 he re-joined the Welch Fusiliers and accompanied them to France in October with the 7th Division to cover the retreat of the Belgian Army and the British Naval Brigade from Antwerp; they travelled by train to Ghent where they ensured the Belgian Army was secure on 11th October. Towards the end of that month they were engaged in the heavy fighting near Roulers, which preceded the First Battle of Ypres. At 8 a.m. on 20th, the 22nd Infantry Brigade (of which his Battalion formed a part) attacked the German position near Zonnebeke, which was found to be unexpectedly strong. In the retirement that ensued Captain Kington was struck by a shell and killed instantly. Another Wykehamist of 22 Brigade, Lieutenant Gerald Sclater Ingram (I, 1904-1907) Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed at Zonnebeke on the same day (see individual entry).

War: World War 1

  • Surname: Kington
  • Forenames or initials: William Miles
  • House: D
  • Years in School: 1889-1890
  • Rank: Captain
  • Regiment: Royal Welch Fusiliers
  • Date of Birth: 25th April 1876
  • Date of Death: 21st October 1914
  • How Died: Killed in action
  • Location in War Cloister: Outer H2
  • Decoration: D.S.O.
  • Burial Site: Unknown but commemorated on Panel 22 of the MENIN GATE MEMORIAL, YPRES